MMORPG for Dummies: Inside the world of Fiesta By Phylicia Cash

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February 15, 2012 by Phe.

The first video game I ever really played was Fiesta online. That’s the funniest thing about the game, it’s online. First released November 2, 2007, Fiesta is, according to Wikipedia, “a free to play MMORPG (meaning Massively multiplayer online role-playing game), published by Ons On Soft in Korea, and hosted by gamigo AG for EU territories (in English, German, French and Spanish languages) as well as by Outspark for the North American English market.” It is of a fantasy–world origin set in the fantasy world of Isya and contains monsters that one must fight in order to remain alive and gain experience points. The most attractive thing about Fiesta is the infinite number of quests that are available in the many different citites. Through these quests, the player is able to gain money or rare items (like dragon teeth) that they can sell so they can buy necessary supplies (like food or healing potions) and upgraded armor. Fiesta would most definitely be considered a sandbox game where you could easily become lost (something I’ve done plenty times!) or potentially find a worthwhile quest.

Like with most other MMORPGs, Fiesta has classes—or types of people—that you can be. These classes include Archers, Fighters, Mages, Clerics and Tricksters. The archers are long-ranged fighters that use bows and/or crossbows. Fighters are a close range class that fight with one or two-handed swords or axes. They can also wield a shield. Mages are a long-ranged class like archers that use staffs and swords. Of all the classes, the Clerics are a pretty special class in that they are the only classes that can heal and resurrect other players. Clerics also fight close range with maces and hammers. The last class, Tricksters, is relatively new to Fiesta; they are close ranged fighters like Fighters and Clerics that use claws to fight. Other than adhering to these classes, your character can basically look like whatever you want (or can afford).

Fiesta is a self-supporting world inasmuch as the players make the decisions on where their characters are going to go and which quests they are going to accept. The game, which is open to players all around the world, is geared towards an infinite amount of game play. Surely a potential hot bed for addiction, the only real objects are to level up, beat monsters, finish quests and maybe (if you are lucky enough to level up to 60) become a part of a guild so you can participate in PVP (Player versus Player) fights.

                                                               

Being online and available to just about anyone with a computer, Fiesta is virtually a world all of its own. In fact, the world actually has a creation story (http://fiesta.outspark.com/guides/story). In Fiesta, a player can have a completely different life where they are totally unrecognizable from their corporal, real-world selves. I myself am an archer with pointed ears and blue hair. The ludology, or how you play and understand this game, is totally up to you. When first beginning this game, that had to have been my favorite part. When you first start out, Fiesta gives you the opportunity to do intro quests. With names like “Baby Steps” and “Even More Baby Steps”, these quests teach you the ins and outs of your class and the world. Within Fiesta, all the primary functions of life are represented; there’s food to eat, houses to rest in, pets to take care of and even the possibility of finding love.

The best (and, in my opinion, most original) part of this game is the wedding option. When you meet that special someone while in the game, you can propose to them. If they accept, you are sent on a quest to obtain a wedding license and a ring. Then you have a very authentic wedding ceremony in which you are dressed up, you have vows and where you can invite guests. You even get wedding presents!

Overall, I think that Fiesta is a pretty good MMORPG. It has enough fighting and everyday life events to be appealing to many different types of people; the graphics are pretty clear (even if they are in the (somewhat) over used anime form); and, best of all, this game is free!

If you would like to try out Fiesta for yourself here is where you can download it:

http://fiesta.outspark.com/

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